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Catalog and Create a Library of Your Books, Games, Movies, and Music with Libib

Surrounded by books on the floor.
Tons of music compact discs.
While in the U.S. Navy, my husband collected a lot of music. He can’t seem to part with the discs.

 

In the past, I’ve researched database templates that would allow me to catalog and create a library of my books, games, and music. I never liked the results that I found, and the project never moved forward. Since I started My Bookshelf project on Instagram, I revisited my search, and I’m happy to report that I have fallen in love with Libib.com.

I wanted a program that would allow me to easily catalog my books, video games, movies, and music. The program needed to offer me the opportunity to enter my own notes and photos. I really wanted a portable method of viewing the list, too. Libib.com offers all those things and more! No, I’m not a paid spokesperson; I’m just an excited user.

Adding an item is a breeze. Items that don’t have a UPC or ISBN number require a general search. I use this feature when looking up my games. I don’t have many boxes for these items. The search feature returns a list of potential matches. If there are multiple matches, just scroll down the list and find your match, and click “Add Game.”¬† The item will be added to your library.

Notification of game addition.

The program alerts you if you’ve added a duplicate item.

Entering a game that exists on Libib.com

You can then go to the item in your library and click the up arrow button to indicate that you have another copy of the item.

Add a duplicate copy of an item to your library

The Android app is easy to use, and it even has a scanner built into the program. Tip: Don’t be discouraged if you try to manually enter a UPC and the item isn’t found. Try the name of the album or band in the general search, and if you still can’t find it, try the app. I tried entering the UPC from a music CD and it said no results were found. I scanned it with the app, and it found the perfect match.

If you discover the item isn’t listed, you can manually enter the item, and add your own photo!

Manually enter items in Libib.com

You can add tags, groups, notes, and reviews to an item. If you need to delete an item, you can do that. There is also a purchase button listed that takes you to the appropriate listing on Amazon.com.

Libib also has a social aspect to it. You can keep your libraries private or publish them for others to view. I’ve just published my libraries to share with you. I’ve just begun! Check back soon and watch my collection grow.

Check out my collection at Libib.com

I’ve already heard of people using their libraries in so many ways. Someone started a book library to help keep track of the books in their classroom. The students make comments on the books, and they leave notes for checkout purposes.

If you already have a list of your stuff, you can import a .csv file! You can also export the .csv file of the libraries you create! Why would you want to do that? One, you can have that file for insurance purposes should something happen to your stuff, and two, you can use the list to help alphabetize your shelves.

Find out more about the features that Libib.com offers, and see how it can help you become a master of organization.

Cost: FREE

Item limit: 100,000

A few quibbles:

Some of the listings come with additional comments from people who are selling their games. You can edit these posts, but you can’t delete the statements and leave the space blank. When I delete the statements and save it, hoping for a blank box, the statements are back as though I had never deleted them. I get around this by writing a note and saving it. The other notes are gone once I do this.

However, the note that was entered with the E.T. game is perfect, so I won’t be deleting that one.

Some comments deserve to stay!

Also, the number of items doesn’t go up when you add a second copy of something. This would be nice to have as an option. I know some people may not want that, but a little toggle for that feature would be cool.

Room for improvement:

I’d love to see board games added to the mix of items I can catalog. I have a serious board game addiction.

I love this program. End the clutter on your bookshelf and start cataloging your home library!

Let me know if you’ve tried it!

 

Surrounded by books on the floor.
My books are waiting to be organized on the bookshelves.

 

 

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Edit Your Manuscript While Listening to Text-to-Speech Readers

icon for audio

icon for audio

 

Thanks to The Digital Reader, I read the post by¬†Morris Rosenthal of Foner Books that detailed how he uses the text-to-speech (TTS) function on his Kindle as a proofreading aid for his writing. I don’t have a Kindle, so I wondered if I could do the same with Microsoft Word, and after a quick search, I found the helpful instructions that got me on my way. I used the same method to activate the function in OneNote, which is my favorite writing program. Play around with the speed settings and find the right speed for your reader. I needed to adjust mine, as she was reading too fast, and it caused some words to run together.

Hearing your words spoken, even by a computer voice, can help you find errors your own voice or eyes may have missed. When a writer reads their own work, it is easy to overlook misplaced or missing words. Our eyes can easily deceive us, since our brains want to supply the words we had intended. Our ears are much more reliable. I love having more tools to help me edit and proofread my work.

Here are a few other sources I found that you may find interesting.

WordTalk is a free Widows text-to-speech plugin for Microsoft Word, and if you fancy, you can download a Scottish voice to read text back to you (free w/restrictions, or pay).

NaturalReader is a program that offers a free “cut and paste” and type reader with two male voices and three female voices (limits you to 200 words). They also have a free version you can download in addition to the other packages available for purchase.

Another free program is YakiToMe! that touts it is the world’s leading unrestricted, free text-to-speech (TTS) website. You can “cut and paste” and type your text into the provided box, or upload a file, including a PDF. I typed in a simple sentence and enjoyed the robust reading and clear voice that read my words back to me.

Happy editing! Feel free to share any TTS programs that you use.